First Aid for Accidental Swallowing for Dogs

The following information describes an emergency procedure and should only be performed if instructed to do so by a veterinarian. I personally never had to use this method but I was close once and looked it up. I ended up doing a Heimlich-Maneuver on my dog instead and it worked in that particular case (I have passed a pet first aid class by the Red Cross, which does come in handy in emergency situations). If you ever have to use this method, it is good to have a food grade hydrogen peroxide product available and not one ladden with heavy metals and other pollutants like the $0.99 hydrogen peroxide products are full of. The following procedure is from the website: http://www.petplace.com
Frequently, dogs ingest items, chemicals or foods that have the potential to be dangerous or even toxic. If you see this ingestion, you may be able to avoid the potential danger by making your dog vomit.
Inducing vomiting should be done only if instructed by your veterinarian. The procedure can be hazardous. I strongly encourage you to contact your family veterinarian or local veterinary emergency center for advice regarding the appropriateness of inducing vomiting for each specific incident. The item or substance ingested, the time and amount.
Three percent hydrogen peroxide is quite effective in making dogs and cats vomit. You must be sure to use three percent peroxide and not hair coloring strength peroxide. Despite the label indicating that hydrogen peroxide is toxic, it is safe to give to dogs for this purpose. It is considered toxic since it induces vomiting and therefore does not stay in the body.
The appropriate dose of hydrogen peroxide is one teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight. If you have an oral syringe, one teaspoon equals 5 cc or 5 ml. Once given, walk your dog around or gently shake the stomach area to mix the peroxide with the stomach contents. Vomiting should occur within 15 to 20 minutes. If no vomiting occurs, you can safely repeat the three percent hydrogen peroxide once. If it is still not effective, your dog may need to be seen by a veterinarian for stronger vomiting medication.
Once the hydrogen peroxide is given, it is important to watch your pet so that he does not re-ingest the substance. If there is concern about toxicity, collect and take a sample of the vomitus to your veterinarian.
(Source: http://www.petplace.com)
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Ralf Weber is a certified dog trainer (IACP CDT, CDTA) and behaviorist. A professional member of the International Association of Canine Professionals (IACP) and an AKC evaluator for Puppy S.T.A.R., Canine Good Citizen, and Community Canine certifications.
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